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Archivist's Note
Ned Scott portrait: Ned Scott relaxes at one of his favorite haunts near Kayenta in Northern Arizona in 1938.  Rock escarpments in the background inspired him to compare the area to New York in a 1935 letter: "If one could spend every moment of every day seeing all there is in New York they would not feel as I do today--still in a coma--still in fairlyland". Photo snapshot by Gwladys Scott.

This site pays tribute to my father, Ned Scott, a still photographer who toiled in the Hollywood film industry. With no formal photographic training or even a high school education, Ned Scott created memorable images which are found on the covers of books and magazines today, 70 years after their creation.

Ned Scott photographed A-list celebrities during the 1930s and 40s classic film period. He shuttered some of the best John Wayne photos and photos of Rita Hayworth ever seen. His stylish imagery says a great deal about the world of the Hollywood stillman who stepped behind the lens of the large format cameras then in common use. Very little remains of the stories of Hollywood's first photographers. I hope this web site can provide a tiny glimpse into that world.

The Hollywood of yesteryear excluded any recognition of the still photographer. Film credits rolled without ever mentioning their names. At the same time, still imagery contributed mightily to the financial health of Hollywood. So little is known of these artists, or under what conditions they struggled. Even at this late hour, credit is due. Their legacy is frozen in the prints and images that survive in small numbers.

Please note, no permission for commercial or personal usage of posted images is given or implied by The Ned Scott Archive. After 20 years, the Archive continues research as relevant new material constantly surfaces which will enrich Ned Scott's story.  It gives me great pleasure to share my father's art and his legacy.

Norm Scott 

Gay NelsonGay Nelson plays Joanna Maitland, a social secretary working for a Palm Beach charity, who runs away from her New England conservative relatives and escapes to Palm Beach.  Things get complicated when she knowingly uses some of the charity funds for her own purposes.  Director Sidney Salkow's crime drama, Millie's Daughter, 1947.  This was the first of eight films Gay Nelson acted.  A relatively obscure actress, Nelson achieves the height of fashion and allure in front of Ned Scott's camera.

 

Archivist's Note

Ned Scott on Wikipedia