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John Wayne Photos

These John Wayne photos were taken by Ned Scott during the filming of "Stagecoach" 1939 and "The Long Voyage Home" 1941. These photographs rank as some of the most recognizable and famous images of John Wayne.

John Wayne, born Marion Robert Morrison on May 26, 1907, was an American actor, producer and director. He is a timeless American icon, an Academy Award winner and the biggest box office draw in history. Known for his walk, voice, height and demeanor, he was the very image of masculinity.

Born in Winterset, Iowa, started out working at film studios in Los Angeles, California after he lost a football scholarship due to a bodysurfing accident. He started out with bit parts in the Fox Film Corporation. His first break which made him an instant celebrity was the film Stagecoach in 1939. He starred in 142 films, most of them Western.

Some of his most well known films are The Quiet Man, The Searchers, Rio Bravo, True Grit and The Shootist.
John Wayne was the epitome of American ideals and values. He has never played a character that shot a man in the back. If the script required it, he had it changed.

His popularity was such that when Japanese Emperor Hirohito visited the USA in 1975, he specifically asked to be introduced to Wayne, who in the film Sands of Iwo Jima played the emperorís enemy.

Wayne visited the war zones during World War II. He was such an icon to the United States Armed Forces that many war veterans claimed their motivation in serving the army was inspired by his movies.

Wayne was vocal about being a conservative Republican throughout his life. He supported the House of American Activities Committee and was an anti-communist. To express his support against communism, he made the film Big Jim McLain in 1952. Soviet documents that have been declassified show that Soviet premier Joseph Stalin ordered the assassination of John Wayne because of his anti-communist stand.

Wayne died in 1979 of stomach cancer.

He was named the 13th Greatest Male Screen Legends of All Time by the American Film Institute in June 1999.

More John Wayne photos by Ned Scott will be added to the gallery as they are unearthed, we hope you enjoy those that are here.

From the movie. “Stagecoach”

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From the movie, “The Long Voyage Home”

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John Wayne Photos John Wayne and Claire Trevor share a light moment on set as the Ringo Kid and the Outcast Girl in Director John Ford's epic Western saga, "Stagecoach", 1939.

Burgess Meredith Photos

These Burgess Meredith photos were taken by Ned Scott in late 1944 during the filming of The Story of G.I. Joe.  Meredith protrayed War Correspondent Ernie Pyle in the film.

Burgess Meredith, born November 7, 1907, was an American actor and director in film, theater and television.  Meredith had a rich and varied career.  He is known for his role as the arch villian in the Batman TV series, the serious and wise boxing trainer in the Rocky films, his more demanding roles in classical and contemporary theater, and finally his comic role as the sex-starved father in the Grumpier Old Men series of films.  If it weren't for his more prominent roles in many of his film and TV efforts, one could consider Meredith as an accomplished character actor. 

Graduating from Amherst College in 1931, Meredith later served in the United States Armed Forces where he attained the rank of Captain in the U.S. Army in WWII.  With the agreement of the War Department, he was discharged from the Army so that he could work for producer Lester Cowan in the film The Story of G.I. Joe in 1944.  He played the role of Pulitzer Award winning correspondent Ernie Pyle in the film. 

Meredith became involved in theater early in his career.  For most of the '30's, he found himself working in the Civic Repertory Theater in New York City.  His participation included acting in major roles and directing stage productions.  It was in cinema that he truly came into his own as an actor.  Hi was a favorite of director Otto Preminger who cast him in In Harm's Way, Advise and Consent, Hurry Sundown, and others. 

Burgess Meredith was married four times, and two of his wives were actresses.  He and his last wife were together for 46 years, producing two children.  He suffered from a form of bipolar disorder, according to his autobiography.  Meredith died in Malibu, California on September 9, 1998 at the age of 89.

As more Burgess Meredith photos are unearthed in the future, they will be displayed here for everyone to enjoy. 

Burgess Meredith, as Ernie Pyle, enjoys a bite of C rations on the set of The Story of G.I. Joe.  Ernie often heated his rations by using gasoline.  He would dig a little hole in the dirt or sand, place some gas into the hole, cover it again with sand, and light it.  The gas would burn slowly enough for him to heat a can of food or a cup of coffee.  Ernie preferred the British COMPO rations to the U.S. Army C rations because there was more variety.  Many G.I.'s, right after landing in Oran (where Ernie came ashore during Operation Torch) would give away portions of their C rations to ragged Arab children who followed the G.I.'s around relentlessly. There's nothing like a cigarette to comfort the battle weary war correspondent in The Story of G.I. Joe.  Burgess Meredith as Ernie Pyle gets ready to light up during a tough day at the front.  No cigarettes were allowed at night due to the ever vigilant enemy artillery spotters who would quickly zone in on such a target.  According to Lee Miller in his 1946 book, An Ernie Pyle Album, Ernie always wore a woven hat identical to this one out in the field. Camp dogs were everything to the combat soldier at the front.  Here Burgess Meredith plays Ernie Pyle in The Story of G.I. Joe holding the camp's mascot dog during a rainy and cold moment at the front.  Burgess Meredith was already serving in the U.S. Army on active duty as a Captain when Lester Cowan approached him to take the role of Ernie Pyle.  The Army released Meredith on an honorable discharge so he could take the role, but that occurred only after presidential adviser Harry Hopkins greased the way and George C. Marshall approved the discharge personally. U.S. War Correspondents play themselves as news arrives that Ernie Pyle had been awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Journalism from U.S. War Correspondents play themselves in a reenactment of receiving news that Ernie Pyle had been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Journalism  in The Story of G.I. Joe.
U.S. War Correspondents play themselves as they celebrate the news that Ernie Pyle had been awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Journalism from The Story of G.I. Joe. Sharing a cigarette with his Army buddies, Burgess Meredith as Ernie Pyle underscores the fact that he shared the privations of his regular soldiers while they were hunkering down in an improvised shelter, safe from enemy action, during inclement weather. While working on the movie set, Ned Scott could always be found chewing on a match stick, an Ohio Bue Tip ,atch stick to be precise.  And when he was not chewing on a stick, he was lighitng up and enjoying one of his Kent cigarettes.  Ernie Pyle and Burgess Meredith decided to imitate Ned Scott with synchronous poses for this photograph.  It was a light moment, one of many, and it speaks to the sense of comradery these men all felt toward one another on the set of Story of G.I. Joe. Pausing for a moment's reflection, Ernie Pyle, author of Here Is Your War and Burgess Meredith, star of the upcoming movie Story of G.I. Joe share thoughts while on the movie set. Burgess Meredith, star of Story of G.I. Joe, walks the movie set with Ernie Pyle who is dressed in his AWC (American War Correspondent) uniform, discussing the upcoming filming of the movie.
Burgess Meredith discusses Ernie Pyle's new book Here Is Your War with Ernie Pyle on the set of The Story of G.I. Joe.  Meredith had been furloughed from active duty as a captain in the U. S. Army by the War Department, and here he is wearing his regulation uniform with captain's rank insignia.  Meredith plays the role of Ernie Pyle in the movie. One of Ernie's fellow War Correspondents assigned to the film production of The Story of G. I. Joe teases Ernie about his regulation haircut and knit hat which Ernie always wore at the front. Burgess Meredith who played the role of Ernie in the film, looks on with approval.  On the set during filming, Meredith wore this hat or one identical to it for authenticity. Lester Cowan, seated, is flanked on the left by Captain Burgess Meredith, recently furloughed from active duty by the War Department for his role in The Story of G.I. Joe, and Ernie Pyle, U.S. War Correspondent from Scripps-Howard News Service.  In the film, Meredith played the the role of Ernie Pyle. Ned Scott took this photograph in an office at Selznick International Studios in Culver City, California. Cadet Nurse Beulah Tyler gets an earful from Burgess Meredith who plays the role of Ernie Pyle in The Story of G.I. Joe.  Capt. Walker (stand in for Capt. Waskow) demands at the point of his machine gun that the supply officer issue turkey for Christmas dinner as Ernie Pyle (played by Burgess Meredith) looks on. Scene from The Story of G.I. Joe.
Ernie Pyle (played by Burgess Meredith) jokes with officers and men in a light moment at one of the camps the front.  Ernie Pyle had an infectious sense of humor. Scene from The Story of G.I. Joe. Burgess Meredith's character Ernie Pyle takes the chance to talk to soldiers as they rest briefly between combat duties at the Tunisian front, from The Story of G.I. Joe Combat at the front was spartan conditions, even brutal when cold weather hit.  Burgess Meredith's character Ernie Pyle endures hardships at the front with his soldiers, from the Story of G.I. Joe.  At the front, troops took advantage of any feature of the terrain to shelter themselves both from weather and from enemy aircraft and artillery action. Christmas dinner at the front in The Story of G.I. Joe.  Food was always a big issue, and anything fresh was rare.  When such a meal was presented, G.I.'s were enthusiastic eaters.  Burgess Meredith plays Ernie Pyle who shares the soldier's meals at the front. The Story of G.I. Joe.  Food was always a big issue, and anything fresh was rare.  When such a meal was presented, G.I.'s were enthusiastic eaters.  Burgess Meredith plays Ernie Pyle who shares the soldier's meals at the front. After a successful forward surge by the company at the front, Burgess Meredith as Ernie Pyle takes a moment to relax in the shelled remains of a building in a small Italian town.  Meredith is actually sitting in the back seat of a car, the only part of the car still remaining after the attack. Scene from The Story of G.I. Joe.
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Ernie Pyle Photos

These Ernie Pyle photos  taken by Ned Scott all originated from the process of filming The Story of G.I. Joe in 1944.  Ernie Pyle had arrived on the set of the film at the request of independent film producer Lester Cowan.  It was late in 1944, and Ernie had already been to the overseas war theater twice, once to North Africa and Sicily, and then to Southern Italy and France.  These sojourns as a U.S. War Correspondent had served as journalistic basis for his two books, Here Is Your War and Brave Men. Ernie's role while there in Hollywood was to polish the movie script which had already been created.  Over the few short weeks he was there, however, his presence became a story in and of itself.  He lent a unique quality to the filming process because of who he was to all war veterans, serving soldiers and news-reading Americans everywhere.

Ernie had an infectious sense of humor which was on display while he toured the front lines in combat areas.  He was no pampered or special envoy.  Never shrinking from the sometimes brutal enemy fire, Ernie shared the privations of the regular army doughfoot by hunkering down with them as they took cover from shrieking artillery shells and diving aircraft.  His willingness to get dirty at the front endeared him to his men, and when he interviewed them at slack times, they willingly opened up with their stories.  Everything about them was important to Ernie, where they lived, sisters or brothers, where they attended school and such mundane facts.   His style of writing was therefore simple and clear, but at the same time, it was eloquent.

New Ernie Pyle photos by Ned Scott will be added to the gallery as they are unearthed, and we hope you enjoy these that are here.  

According to Lee Miller,  Ernie habitually went two or three days without shaving.  He could often be seen with a visible stubble, as seen here.  Portrait from the set of The Story of G.I. Joe. According to Lee Miller,  Ernie habitually went two or three days without shaving.  He could often be seen with a visible stubble, as seen here.  Portrait from the set of The Story of G.I. Joe. Ernie Pyle poses for Ned Scott under the bas-relief statue of the Virgin Mary.  Nothing was suggested by Ned Scott when he posed Ernie for this image, just the form complemented the man.  Though Ernie looks larger here, he only weighed in at 110 pounds. While working on the movie set, Ned Scott could always be found chewing on a match stick, an Ohio Bue Tip ,atch stick to be precise.  And when he was not chewing on a stick, he was lighitng up and enjoying one of his Kent cigarettes.  Ernie Pyle and Burgess Meredith decided to imitate Ned Scott with synchronous poses for this photograph.  It was a light moment, one of many, and it speaks to the sense of comradery these men all felt toward one another on the set of Story of G.I. Joe. Pausing for a moment's reflection, Ernie Pyle, author of Here Is Your War and Burgess Meredith, star of the upcoming movie Story of G.I. Joe share thoughts while on the movie set.
Lee Miller extends a courtesy to Ernie Pyle, lighting his cigarrette while both men take a monent's pause while on the movie set of Story of G.I. Joe.  Dressed in their War Correspondent's uniforms, both men assisted in the making of the film by polishing the script.  And the presence of Ernie Pyle energized the combat war veterans who participated in the film as cast members.  Both men were very good friends having been in the news business together for many years.  There is an ease, an intimacy shown here between these two which only the ritual of lighting a cigarrette can properly convey. Burgess Meredith, star of Story of G.I. Joe, walks the movie set with Ernie Pyle who is dressed in his AWC (American War Correspondent) uniform, discussing the upcoming filming of the movie. Burgess Meredith discusses Ernie Pyle's new book Here Is Your War with Ernie Pyle on the set of The Story of G.I. Joe.  Meredith had been furloughed from active duty as a captain in the U. S. Army by the War Department, and here he is wearing his regulation uniform with captain's rank insignia.  Meredith plays the role of Ernie Pyle in the movie. Ernie Pyle and one of the soldiers relax between filming of the movie.  Surrounding Ernie are authentic weapons and battle gear from the film production. Ernie Pyle takes a break on the bombed out set of the movie Story of G. I. Joe.  Leaning against metal stack, Ernie sizes up the situation while dressed in his War Correspondent's uniform. Ernie Pyle talks with the children who were visiting the set of Story of G.I. Joe.  These were the children of Tom Treanor, a distinguished war correspondent, who was Ernie's contemporary and friend in the European theater of the war.  The children's names are Tommy, 11, John, 9 and Cordelia, 6.  Mrs. Tom Treanor, the correspondent's widow, looks on with satisfaction and approval.  Tom Treanor lost his life covering the conflict.
One of Ernie's fellow War Correspondents assigned to the film production of The Story of G. I. Joe teases Ernie about his regulation haircut and knit hat which Ernie always wore at the front. Burgess Meredith who played the role of Ernie in the film, looks on with approval.  On the set during filming, Meredith wore this hat or one identical to it for authenticity. Ernie chats with Morrie Riskind on the set of The Story of G.I. Joe.  Riskind, himself a Pulitzer Prize winner and a distinguished playwright, wound up of the set of The Story of G.I. Joe to assist in polishing the script for Director William Wellman and Independent film producer Lester Cowan. Ernie Pyle interviews Pvt. Kenneth Fowler of the 34th Infantry Division, a combat veteran of the North African and Sicilian campaigns of 1942-43.  Ernie Pyle performed many similar interviews while serving as a U.S. War Correspondent during his tour of duty with the U.S. Army.  These interviews formed the basis of his many news dispatches sent to outlets back in the United States.  And these together with his own stories of his many weeks at the front create the core of his famous book , Here Is Your War, on which the film The Story of G.I. Joe is based. Ernie Pyle poses with Corporal James Slayton, one of the most decorated G.I.'s of World War II.  At Camp Baldwin, the headquarters for the infantry company which appeared in The Story of G.I. Joe, the track which circumnavigated the camp was renamed Pyle Road in Ernie's honor.  With arms outstretched , a  bas-relief statue of the Virgin Mary gathers protectively behind Ernie Pyle as he poses on the set of The Story of G.I. Joe.  Ned Scott was making a hopeful statement with this prosaic pose.  Keep Ernie Safe.  In October and November of 1944 when this photograph was taken, no one could have predicted the tragic fate which would befall Ernie has he ventured to the Pacific Theater in 1945 on non-combatant duty as a U.S. War Correspondent. Lee G. Miller, former editor of the Washington Daily News and Ernie Pyle relax on the set of The Story of G.I. Joe as they observe filming in progress.  Lee Miller and Ernie had been friends for many years in the news business.  Both Miller and Paige Cavanaugh, another of Ernie's close news buddies joined Ernie on the set of the film as paid consultants.  Producer Lester Cowan no doubt agreed to this idea which most  likely emerged in the many discussions surrounding the final tweaking of the movie script.
Ernie Pyle relaxes with Special Forces Army officers (Rangers), combat veterans of the D-Day Campaign, on the set of The Story of G.I. Joe. Ernie Pyle, here wearing his War Correspondent's uniform, relaxes with actor Burgess Meredith on the film set of "The Story of G.I. Joe."  In the film Meredith plays the role of Ernie Pyle, decorated war correspondent, during the Allies drive to Rome after landing on the boot of the Italian Penninsula in WWII.  Ernie stayed about three weeks on set while the film was in porduction, then he shipped out to the West Pacific where he ulitmately lost his life at the hands of a Japanese sniper.  Director William Wellman's epic war drama "The Story of G.I. Joe", 1945.

Andy Devine Photos

These photos taken by Ned Scott are those character actor studies of Andy as Buck, the driver and mule skinner in Stagecoach.  In this role, Andy had a quirky but pleasing demeanor which only served to underline his profound fear of Apaches. 

Andy Devine was born in Flagstaff, Arizona, on October 7, 1905.  Andy spent his boyhood in Kingman, Arizona, not far from Flagstaff.  He attended t Mary's and St. Benedict's College and then Northern Arizona State Teacher's College.  He also attended Santa Clara University where he played football.  It was his football experience which was to lead him into his first acting role in 1931 in The Spirit of Notre Dame.  

Andy became known for his raspy voice.  At first it was not a positive offering to the acting world, and he was shunned as the industry moved from silent films to talkies.  However, his peculiar voice soon became his trademark and it anchored his character roles.  He played in over 400 films moving easily from "B" films to class A films with no loss of appeal.  Some of his most well known films beside Stagecoach are A Star is Born (1937), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence (1962) and Island in the Sky (1953).

New Andy Devine photos wll be added from time to time as they are unearthed, and we hope you enjoy the ones which are here. 

 

 

 

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